Special issue: Ecoacoustics and Biodiversity Monitoring

by Dan Stowell, Queen Mary University of London, UK & Jérôme Sueur, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, Paris, France Can monitoring sounds help us to meet the world’s biodiversity targets? Nature sound recordings have been collected for over a hundred years, with an exponential increase since the 1950s. Most such recordings were taken…

Using a fixed-wing, water-landing UAV to classify tropical marine habitats

by Sophia L. Ellis Accompanying the paper: Influence of altitude on tropical marine habitat classification using imagery from fixed‐wing, water‐landing UAV s Tropical marine habitats within a seascape form some of the most productive ecosystems in the coastal zone. They provide important ecosystem services and are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Fine-scale monitoring of these…

From Presence-Absence to Abundance: Application of the Occupancy Framework to Estimate Abundance

By Tim O’Brien This blog is an accompaniment to the paper: Camera trapping reveals trends in forest duiker populations in African National Parks. Read the full paper here Presence-absence surveys (more properly detection-nondetection surveys) and occupancy surveys, are often used as indicators of the health of wildlife population. Occupancy surveys use a replicated sampling design where…

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

by Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Species are often involved in complex interactions with other species, which can affect their occurrence, abundance, feeding habits and disease transmission. Observing and studying species interactions can be difficult. To circumvent this problem, ecologists increasingly rely on remote devices such as camera traps. In a recent study…