Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

by Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Species are often involved in complex interactions with other species, which can affect their occurrence, abundance, feeding habits and disease transmission. Observing and studying species interactions can be difficult. To circumvent this problem, ecologists increasingly rely on remote devices such as camera traps. In a recent study…

Optimization of sensor deployment for acoustic detection and localization in terrestrial environments

Evelyn Piña‐Covarrubias, Andrew P. Hill, Peter Prince, Jake L. Snaddon, Alex Rogers, C. Patrick Doncaster, 2018, Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, https://doi.org/10.1002/rse2.97  The rapid evolution in miniaturisation, power efficiency and affordability of acoustic sensors, combined with new innovations in smart capability, are vastly expanding opportunities in ground‐level monitoring for wildlife conservation at a regional scale,…

Phenology and climate change in Africa and the decline of Afro-Palearctic migratory bird populations

Alison Beresford RSPB Centre for Conservation Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom   Every autumn, millions of Afro-palearctic migratory birds make the long journey from their breeding grounds in Europe to wintering grounds in sub-Saharan Africa, returning north again in the spring.  Over the last 50 years, the European breeding populations of many of these species have…

A more economical way to crowdsource camera trap image classifications?

Pen-Yuan Hsing and Philip Stephens, Conservation Ecology Group, Department of Biosciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom DH1 3LE (@MammalWeb) This blog post is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. You can read the full research paper here. To conserve biodiversity effectively, we need to know where and in what abundance it occurs. Breeding bird…