From Presence-Absence to Abundance: Application of the Occupancy Framework to Estimate Abundance

By Tim O’Brien This blog is an accompaniment to the paper: Camera trapping reveals trends in forest duiker populations in African National Parks. Read the full paper here Presence-absence surveys (more properly detection-nondetection surveys) and occupancy surveys, are often used as indicators of the health of wildlife population. Occupancy surveys use a replicated sampling design where…

Studying species interactions using remote camera traps

by Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Species are often involved in complex interactions with other species, which can affect their occurrence, abundance, feeding habits and disease transmission. Observing and studying species interactions can be difficult. To circumvent this problem, ecologists increasingly rely on remote devices such as camera traps. In a recent study…

Optimization of sensor deployment for acoustic detection and localization in terrestrial environments

Evelyn Piña‐Covarrubias, Andrew P. Hill, Peter Prince, Jake L. Snaddon, Alex Rogers, C. Patrick Doncaster, 2018, Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, https://doi.org/10.1002/rse2.97  The rapid evolution in miniaturisation, power efficiency and affordability of acoustic sensors, combined with new innovations in smart capability, are vastly expanding opportunities in ground‐level monitoring for wildlife conservation at a regional scale,…