Pictures or pellets? Comparing camera trapping and dung counts as methods for estimating population densities of ungulates

Sabine Pfeffer Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden   Researchers, conservationists and stakeholders all over the world are confronted with an important question: What is a reliable, time and cost efficient method to monitor changing wildlife communities? Which census method is most suitable for reliable population estimates? Is there one method that would work…

Plains to Peaks: Mapping wetlands and riparian areas in the Rocky Mountains

Stephen Chignell Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA   Wetlands and riparian areas are important for an array of landscape functions, including flow regulation, nutrient cycling, and wildlife habitat. However, human activities are resulting in considerable losses of wetlands worldwide, which is of particular concern in semi-arid and arid landscapes like the Western United…

Open Call for Associate Editors

See below for German, Spanish, French and Portuguese versions The Zoological Society of London is looking for active researchers to join the Editorial Board of Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation. Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation is a fully open access journal that aims to provide a forum for rapid, peer-reviewed publication of novel,…

Special Issue: Key frontiers in camera trapping research

Marcus Rowcliffe Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent’s Park, London, United Kingdom   Biodiversity monitoring makes a central scientific contribution to conservation management and environmental policy. Without it, we have an impaired evidence-base for decision-making in areas such as species management, and forest and agriculture policy. Yet for the world’s terrestrial mammals, traditional…

Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation – three years on…

In 2014 we launched Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, an open-access journal to support communication and collaboration among experts in remote sensing, ecology and conservation science. As we approach our second full year of publication, we thought we would reflect on how the journal has done to date, and take a look at what…

How to map 50,000 km2 of savannah without leaving your office

By Henrike SchulteTobuhne Let’s go on a quick excursion to the West African savannah! Simply open Google Earth or Google maps (make sure you have satellite view enabled), and gradually zoom in on the part of West Africa where Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger meet. You’ll spot a vaguely sine-wave shape of green standing out from…