Different viewpoints, same landscape: do land-based photos and Landsat imagery paint the same picture?

  Julie A. Fortin School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada   Beginning over a hundred years ago, the Canadian government hired land surveyors to map out the mountains of western Canada. These surveyors used unique photo-topographic methods to create topographic maps . As a byproduct of their work, there are…

Optimization of sensor deployment for acoustic detection and localization in terrestrial environments

Evelyn Piña‐Covarrubias, Andrew P. Hill, Peter Prince, Jake L. Snaddon, Alex Rogers, C. Patrick Doncaster, 2018, Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation, https://doi.org/10.1002/rse2.97  The rapid evolution in miniaturisation, power efficiency and affordability of acoustic sensors, combined with new innovations in smart capability, are vastly expanding opportunities in ground‐level monitoring for wildlife conservation at a regional scale,…

Phenology and climate change in Africa and the decline of Afro-Palearctic migratory bird populations

Alison Beresford RSPB Centre for Conservation Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom   Every autumn, millions of Afro-palearctic migratory birds make the long journey from their breeding grounds in Europe to wintering grounds in sub-Saharan Africa, returning north again in the spring.  Over the last 50 years, the European breeding populations of many of these species have…

A more economical way to crowdsource camera trap image classifications?

Pen-Yuan Hsing and Philip Stephens, Conservation Ecology Group, Department of Biosciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom DH1 3LE (@MammalWeb) This blog post is shared under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 license. You can read the full research paper here. To conserve biodiversity effectively, we need to know where and in what abundance it occurs. Breeding bird…

An evaluation of camera trap performance – What are we missing and does deployment height matter?

Caitlin Jacobs Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, USA   Camera traps are a powerful research tool that is becoming increasingly important in the field of wildlife biology. Researchers all over the world use camera traps to assess a wide range of ecological questions, such as wildlife distribution, composition, abundance, density, population trends…

Using remote sensing to map the Earth’s last frontier – a recap of the 2018 GeoHab conference

From 7–11 May, the GeoHab community met in Santa Barbara, California, for its annual conference. GeoHab, which stands for Marine Geological and Biological Habitat Mapping, is an international and multidisciplinary community of marine scientists that includes acousticians, biologists, ecologists, geologists, oceanographers, and spatial scientists, to name a few. One of the objectives of GeoHab is…

International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Over the past 15 years, there has been great effort to inspire and engage women and girls in science. However, according to a study conducted in 14 countries, the probability of women graduating with a Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree and PhD in science-related field are 18%, 8% and 2% respectively, while those percentages for male…